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Sat, 19th of July

Imagine this:
Instead of waiting in her tower, Rapunzel slices off her long, golden hair with a carving knife, and then uses it to climb down to freedom.
Just as she’s about to take the poison apple, Snow White sees the familiar wicked glow in the old lady’s eyes, and slashes the evil queen’s throat with a pair of sewing scissors.
Cinderella refuses everything but the glass slippers from her fairy godmother, crushes her stepmother’s windpipe under her heel, and the Prince falls madly in love with the mysterious girl who dons rags and blood-stained slippers.

Imagine this:
Persephone goes adventuring with weapons hidden under her dress.
Persephone climbs into the gaping chasm.
Or, Persephone uses her hands to carve a hole down to hell.
In none of these versions is Persephone’s body violated unless she asks Hades to hold her down with his horse-whips.
Not once does she hold out on eating the pomegranate, instead biting into it eagerly and relishing the juice running down her chin, staining it red.
In some of the stories, Hades never appears and Persephone rules the underworld with a crown of her own making.
In all of them, it is widely known that the name Persephone means Bringer of Destruction.

Imagine this:
Red Riding Hood marches from her grandmother’s house with a bloody wolf pelt.
Medusa rights the wrongs that have been done to her.
Eurydice breaks every muscle in her arms climbing out of the land of the dead.

Imagine this:
Girls are allowed to think dark thoughts, and be dark things.

Imagine this:
Instead of the dragon, it’s the princess with claws and fiery breath
who smashes her way from the confines of her castle
and swallows men whole.

—   'Reinventing Rescuing,' theappleppielifestyle. (via theappleppielifestyle)   —
Sat, 19th of July

mood boards by drew → belle

Sat, 19th of July

particularscarf:

bacon-radio:

historicaltimes:

Normandy landing that you didnt see. 1944

Red Cross workers.

That is seriously the most badass thing I’ve ever seen.

  #history   #1900s   #1940   #WWII   with 40,013 notes
Fri, 18th of July

tsadde:

I think some people must’ve thought Achilles to be so cruel for not burying Patroclus’ body because to do so was the equivalent of keeping his soul in a state of unrest, but then I think that Achilles must’ve heard so many stories, too. He must’ve heard of how Aphrodite heard Pygmalion’s cries and turned his statue, Gala, to life so that he could be with this woman whom he loved. He must’ve heard of Orpheus and Eurydice, and how Apollo had allowed Orpheus to go to the underworld and bring Eurydice from the dead if only he would not turn back to look at her while they escaped. And maybe he heard of Psyche, too, and how she fought so valiantly and found so much favor to be with Eros once more. 

And I think that’s partly why Achilles held onto Patroclus. There must’ve been a million reasons, but maybe Achilles was waiting for mercy. Maybe he was waiting for his story to turn. Maybe he was hoping for the gods to remember the age in which they were kinder and more understanding to the humans that toiled and heaved and cried beneath Olympus. There’s no patron god of mercy and second chances, but perhaps Achilles was hoping that he, holding onto his Patroclus, his everything, could incite that god or goddess into existence. 

Fri, 18th of July
❝ Well, I think I’ll open the door of the Georgetown house some morning about 2:00 A.M., look up and down the street, and if there’s no one there, I’ll whisper, “It’s Bobby.” ❞
—   John F. Kennedy on how he intended to announce the appointment of his brother to the position of attorney general (1960)   —
Fri, 18th of July
❝ Menstrual pads have been mentioned as early as the 10th century, in the Suda, where Hypatia, who lived in the 4th century AD, was said to have thrown one of her used menstrual rags at an admirer in an attempt to discourage him ❞
—   

if you don’t think history is a truly inspiring subject you’re wrong (via fashiondisastercecil)

I have to add, this wasn’t just a case of a pretty woman got advanced on by a man she didn’t want. He wasn’t just an admirer. He was her student. She was a master at mathematics, astronomy, and philosophy. She had popular public lectures.

And she wasn’t just said to throw her menstrual rags at him. The story I read was that he admitted his admiration in the middle of one of her teachings, and she grabbed her menstrual rags right out from in between her legs, hurled it at him, and told him “This is what you really love, my young man, but you do not love beauty for its own sake.” 

It wasn’t just an attempt to discourage him. It was teaching him a lesson, even when he was interrupting hers.

Basically, Hypatia was amazing.

(via skaldadottir)

   —
Fri, 18th of July

Happy birthday, Leonardo da Vinci! (b. April 15, 1452)
 He who does not value life, does not deserve it. [x]

Fri, 18th of July

engineeringhistory:

Leonardo da Vinci’s design for a flying machine, circa 1487. While da Vinci did not attempt to construct any of his flying machines, he extensively studied bird behavior and applied its principles to his sketches. The first documented successful human flight was in 1783 by Montgolfier brothers on October 19th, using a hot air balloon carrying three passengers.

Thu, 17th of July

marthajefferson:

glitter-of-jewelry:

Gold wreath of a Thracian aristocrat (ca. 4th century BCE) from Golyamata Mogila (Bulgaria)

Wed, 16th of July

wormwoodandhoney:

girls fighting evil: world war II (idea c/o june-born-in-april)

Been knocking out a fast tank, all day

Working on a bomber okay

Boy, you blast my wig with those clinks

And I got to catch my forty winks

So milkman, keep those bottles quiet

-ella mae morse, milkman keep those bottles quiet

(when the boys go off to fight the nazis in the 40s, guess who is left to defend the homefront from the bloodthirsty demons? that’s right, ladies! you!)

  #WWII   #history   #1900s   with 392 notes
Mon, 14th of July

In Greek mythology, Cassandra was the daughter of Priam and Hecuba, the king and queen of Troy. Cassandra was the most beautiful of Priam’s daughters, and the god Apollo fell in love with her. Apollo promised Cassandra the gift of prophecy if she would agree to give herself to him. Cassandra accepted Apollo’s gift but then refiised his advances. Apollo was furious, but he could not take back the powers he had given her. Instead he cursed her, proclaiming that although she would be able to tell the future accurately, no one would believe her. [x]

Mon, 14th of July

p-e-g-g-y-c-a-r-t-e-r:

Peggy’s Heroines of History 1: Nachthexen (“Nightwitches”). I have heard criticism that Peggy Carter as a character is “unrealistic” given the time period. This is a blog series dedicated to arguing against such criticisms. In fact there were many women who made a difference in WWII despite the sexism and oppression of the time. One of these groups of women were the female Soviet pilots known as the Nightwitches.

These young Russian women in their teens and early 20’s - the same age as many tumblr users - flew unarmed, wooden biplanes on stealth missions into enemy territory. They would plot their course, then cut the engine (!!), glide in silently, drop their bombs, and then high tail it out of there through a wall of enemy fire. IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT. IN THE FREEZING COLD. IN OPEN COCKPITS. WHILE THE NAZIS WERE SHOOTING AT THEM. No heat, no guns, no radios, no parachutes. Just a map, a compass, and a hell of a set of ovaries.

Really? No women like Peggy existed during WWII? History tells another story. (source: seize the sky)

  #history   #1900s   #WWII   with 794 notes
Mon, 14th of July

Brazilian mythological creatures are pretty funny

viewtifulworld:

We have Saci, a colored skinned boy who has just one leg, can transform into a whirlwind and does braids on girl’s hair, also he’s a trickster (kind of a brazilian Loki);

The we have the Cuca, a crocodile-woman-monster-witch that eats little children that are bad to their parents;

Boitatá (or Boi-Tatá), a flaming python (actually, “boi” means “bull”, but it has nothing to do with bulls);

Iara, the Water Mother, which is basically a mermaid. THE QUEEN OF RIVER MERMAIDS. SUCK THAT, ARIEL;

O Boto (The Dolphin) is a river dolphin that transforms into a charming man and seduces women, have children with them, and then transforms back into a dolphin and goes back to the rivers;

Besta-Fera (Wild Beast) some legends say that it is similar to a centaur, other say that the Besta-Fera is a kind of huge and ferocious monster;

Curupira, a boy with flaming hair who has inverted feet so that when hunters enter the forest, they get lost on Curupira’s footprints;

Anhagá is the wandering spirit of the deceased. They usually scare people, and they could change their appearence, but the most common is the one of a deer with flaming eyes and a cross on its forehead;

Caipora is a very fast boy who lives in the woods. He is Curupira’s cousin.

Also, the brazilian mythology (based on the tupi-guarani mythology. Tupi-Guarani is the name of the indian people who lived here before the Portuguese arrived) had seven gods:

-Teju Jagua, the god of caves and fruits;

-Mboi Tu’i, the god of rivers and aquatic creatures;

-Moñai, god of prairies;

-Jaci Jaterê, the god of sleep;

-Kurupi, the god of sexuality and fertility;

-Ao Ao, the god of the mountains, and

-Luison, the god of death.

Well, Brazilian-Tupi mythology is hella cool.

Mon, 14th of July

mythsology:

Artemis with shafts of gold loves archery and the slaying of wild beasts in the mountains, the lyre also and dancing and strong-voiced song and shady woods and the cities of upright men.

Oona Chaplin as Artemis